Chart for Converting All-Grain to Extract

How To Convert All-Grain to Extract

Below is a simple chart for converting All-Grain to Extract (or vice versa).  You’ll need to understand the make-up of the extract in question in order to get your results as close to the original recipe as possible.

Some things to keep in mind:

* Most extracts contain some dextrine or crystal malts to help with head retention and provide color.

* Specialty extracts (wheat, rye, etc…) have varying ratios of the advertised specialty malt to barley.  Check the manufacturer website for exact figures and use these numbers in your calculations.

* The below chart figures an efficiency of about 70% and uses round figures.  It is not 100% exact, but it should get you close.  You may need to adjust according to your actual brewhouse efficiency.

 

Grain to Extract Conversion
Grain LME DME
1 0.75 0.6
1.5 1.125 0.9
2 1.5 1.2
2.5 1.875 1.5
3 2.25 1.8
3.5 2.625 2.1
4 3 2.4
4.5 3.375 2.7
5 3.75 3
5.5 4.125 3.3
6 4.5 3.6
6.5 4.875 3.9
7 5.25 4.2
7.5 5.625 4.5
8 6 4.8
8.5 6.375 5.1
9 6.75 5.4
9.5 7.125 5.7
10 7.5 6
10.5 7.875 6.3
11 8.25 6.6
11.5 8.625 6.9
12 9 7.2
12.5 9.375 7.5
13 9.75 7.8
13.5 10.125 8.1
14 10.5 8.4
14.5 10.875 8.7
15 11.25 9
15.5 11.625 9.3
16 12 9.6
16.5 12.375 9.9
17 12.75 10.2
17.5 13.125 10.5
18 13.5 10.8
18.5 13.875 11.1
19 14.25 11.4
20 15 12

 

Next Article:  “Do You Even Oak, Bro” Guide to oak-aging beer.

 

 

 

 

 

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